The “NEW” Normal…

October 26, 2011

Are you trying to deal with the “New Normal” in your life?  If you are like millions of American’s who are dealing with unemployment or under-employment, your “New Normal” might seem pretty frustrating compared the life you had prior to job-loss…

Well, even though this”New Normal” might not be what you want, it is what it is.  Now you have two choices.  Sit there and lament on how “great your life was” or start moving in a new direction.  Here is a video from my good friend, John Spence.  Just a few weeks ago he presented a program at the Apple Specialist Marketing Conference. His talk was  entitled “The New Normal” and focused on how these folks, who sold such incredible Apple products, could continue to be successful as the realities of business and economics remained in constant fluctuation. The talk was even more poignant given the fact that Steve Jobs had passed away just a week earlier.

Here is a very brief excerpt of some of the ideas he shared.  Even though his comments are focused on how he feels companies can survive and thrive in “The New Normal”, the points he makes are just as relevant to you as a job seeker who may be struggling with your “”New Normal”.

I look forward to your comments…


The Secret to Success…

August 25, 2011

Job-seeking, like any other activity, requires you to really focus on being successful.  But if you are like many, you struggle with what “success” actually is!  This video will help you define what success looks like FOR YOU and how YOU can achieve it!

Apply the ideas that John illustrates and tell us how you have applied these tactics in your job search!


It’s tough out there…

May 23, 2011

Everyone knows it’s tough out there finding a job.

At the same time, every week another group publishes new statistics.
Job growth is up, unemployment dipped, open job postings have risen, and so on.

But there’s only one statistic that counts.  The statistic of you.  

Are you working or getting good chances to work if you want to?

Have you been looking for awhile or are you recently in the job market and worried about your prospects?

Doesn’t matter where you live, what industry you are in or how old you are, searching for work can be daunting.  You have to make looking for work, your ‘work’.

I think looking for work is a skill too.  There are things you can learn to increase your chances.

  • Skills to make it easier to target a good job.
  • Skills to handle the interview.
  • Skills to network to find the hidden jobs.
  • Skills to negotiate your salary, and skills to position yourself as the top candidate.

There’s a site I came across while searching on Google that might just be the best bundle of skills teaching I’ve seen in this area.  Take a look by clicking here.

You also need to register for the F’REE WEBINAR!  This is a great way to start developing the skills that you need to get ahead in this job market!

CLICK HERE to register for the webinar!


Dumbing Down Your Resume

February 23, 2011

by Randy Wooden at The Wooden Group

Perhaps you’ve read my February 13, 2011, article in the Winston-Salem Journal.  If not, here’s a somewhat controversial take on adapting your resume to meet the job requirements.

You’ve sacrificed time and money to earn your degree, perhaps adding a master’s degree or better. You’re not only proud of your achievements, but employers should value your efforts.

But wait. You’ve lost your job and, perhaps, are perfectly willing to take a step or two backward to not only stop the financial bleeding, but to re-energize yourself.

We’ve been taught a résumé should make you look as strong as possible. But in some cases, your résumé can be too strong. It can make you appear overqualified for the job you seek.

So should you dumb down your résumé? And what does dumbing down mean?

Dumbing down typically refers to your education. Dropping a master’s degree from your résumé when the employer doesn’t require a graduate degree is appropriate in a tight market. The same can apply to your experience and accompanying job titles.

Deciding what to keep and what to drop can be tricky. Is there an accepted trade-off between, say, a master’s degree and years of experience? Employers have differing opinions.

Here’s my rule of thumb. Consider what a job is likely to pay given its requirements. Is a degree “preferred” or mandatory? If preferred, then drop the master’s and just list your bachelor’s degree.

Consider your years of experience and your job titles. Consider dropping jobs prior to 1995 from your résumé, particularly when the requirements are five to 10 years of experience. Do your job titles seem to match the job you’re interested in? If not, consider altering your title to one more in line.

What if you’re self-employed? As the owner and president of The Wooden Group, I’d list “Sales Manager” on my résumé. Or “Operations Manger” or “Marketing Director” or whatever role I needed to reflect my relevant skills.

Résumés are as much a reflection of your work history and achievements as they are a game of matching key words and educational requirements. If you’re too “heavy” on experience or education, you may be able to perform the job with your eyes closed, but most employers won’t consider you for fear that they can’t afford you or that you’ll leave once you find a higher-paying job more in line with your experience.

The immediate goal is to get an interview. And, assuming you don’t have a contact to bypass the screening process, your résumé needs to match the company’s requirements. At least once you’re in person you’ll have your chance to explain your situation. But by including all your experience and education on your application you likely won’t get that chance.


You’re qualified … but so is your competition. Here are simple ways to make your resume stand out!

January 10, 2011

by Kathy Bernard, Get a Job! Tips blog online.

I spoke with three job seekers this past week who were all well qualified, but all three had the same lament: Nobody was calling them for job interviews. I looked at their resumes and was impressed with their educational background and experience. I also figured out why they weren’t getting calls.

Here is what I learned and how you can use the knowledge to make sure your resume stands out above the rest.

I realized they weren’t getting calls because their resumes didn’t portray them as the most qualified candidates. Could your resume be letting you down? Carefully study and improve your resume with these thoughts in mind:

1. Does your resume reflect how uniquely qualified you are for each job opening? Don’t be lazy or complacent! Diligently modify your cover letter and resume to convince each hiring company you are the best person for the job.

2. Does it include power words and quantifiable results? Don’t just state what you did, show why it mattered.

3. Does it use keywords that were mentioned in the job description? Remember, many recruiters run resumes through a keyword search program, so if you don’t have the right words on your resume, you will automatically be rejected.

4. Is it clearly written and easy to read? If it is filled with jargon or acronyms only people in your past company or industry use, revise the information to be meaningful and impressive for a more general audience.

5. Is it interesting and succinct? Recruiters wade through hundreds of resumes. If you bore or confuse them, they will simply move on to the next one.

6. Does it show that you are qualified for the open position? If your job history has not adequately prepared you for the job, prove you have the abilities through other means, such as by emphasizing your educational background, showing relevant volunteer or freelance experience, or by including examples to prove your expertise.

7. Does it list your qualifications in order of importance and relevance to the job you seek? This sounds like a no-brainer, but if you are an administrative assistant wanting to be a communicator, put your communications experience on top and minimize your admin experience.

8. Is it attractive? A well designed resume makes ample use of white space particularly around the margins and in between sections. Feature no more than two, easy-to-read, typefaces. Make sure type is not too large or too small. Use bullet points to cleanly organize information. Use boldface and italics to draw attention to important elements, but don’t use either excessively.

9. Is it error free? Is your past job history information up to date and correct? Use spell check to check your spelling and grammar, but also review it carefully to make sure spell check didn’t incorrectly “fix” a word. The funniest spell check “miss-fix” I’ve seen was when Microsoft Word fixed the word “position” on a resume to be “prostitution!” Don’t let such a mistake happen to you. Check your job application messages before you hit “send.”


Going Outside the Traditional Resume to Capture the Interview

November 23, 2010

Going Outside the Traditional Resume to Capture the Interview
By: Jessica has a true passion for the job seeker, evidenced by her desire to share everything she can with everyone she can about resume writing and interviewing.
Author Website: http://www.greatresumesfast.com

This past week I was on JobTalkAmerica, a radio show designed around the needs of job seekers in today’s tough economic climate. On the show I discussed two critical points your resume must have in order to succeed and also how to go outside of your resume to get the interview. I want to elaborate further on what you can do outside of your resume that can help you get the interview.

A PROFESSIONALLY WRITTEN LINKEDIN PROFILE

This past week we had a client upload the professional LinkedIn profile that we developed for him and the first day it was online he got an interview with one of his target companies. I think this alone speaks volumes about what a LinkedIn profile can do. You need a keyword-optimized profile, and now LinkedIn has added even more features that will make it easier for employers to find you! Utilize the new features like adding skills, certifications, or publications to your profile; this increases the chances that employers will find you when they’re searching for someone with your background and experience.

A GOOGLE PROFILE

I keep hearing these insane statistics about how many employers are googling potential candidates to research them; this is where a Google profile comes in. Creating a branded and engaging profile gives the hiring manager more information about you and it’s in a place they’re going to look anyway!

A WEB RESUME

A Web resume is another great way to get your experience and expertise out there and make it all searchable. With modern technology these days you really have to up your job search game and find new and creative ways to get in front of the hiring manager. If you know where the hiring manager is (searching on the Net) then that’s where you need to be. It’s another compelling way to brand yourself, direct the information hiring managers find about you, and secure your place in a competitive market.

SOCIAL NETWORKING

Every element of your social networking and online job search should be connected to one another. I have my twitter account linked to my LinkedIn account and my Facebook page; then I have my blog attached to each one of those. I’m hoping I won’t lose you here while I go a bit deeper, but anytime I post to my blog it automatically posts a link to my twitter account, a note to my Facebook page, and an updated blog post to my LinkedIn profile. So everything is interconnected. It saves me time but also refreshes every social network I’m on at the same time; so my fans, followers, and connections can always see what’s new. Tweet, write, and comment on your career, field of interest, and related information, and it won’t go unnoticed!

A VISUAL CV & VIDEO RESUME

A visual CV and video resume are two additional ways to increase your presence on the Internet. I equate a visual CV to a Web resume, although it is a bit more interactive. However, a video resume to me is more cutting edge and attention getting, and while you may not e-mail your video resume to the employer directly when applying or upload it in the application, you can post a link to the video resume in your e-mail signature and on your resume! This leads the hiring manager to more convincing and engaging information about you!

If I were in a job search this is exactly what I’d do:

I would create a video resume and post it to my visual CV as well as my Web resume, LinkedIn profile, Facebook page, and link to my twitter account. But most of all, I would create a blog or personal Web site and upload it there. I would include a link to my LinkedIn profile and video resume on my resume and cover letter whenever I submit it—and also include a link to both in my e-mail signature. Get your information out there—because hiring managers want to see it!

Capture the interview by going where the hiring managers are—online (and they’re not necessarily on the pricey job boards). So get off the job boards and visit the sites I’ve mentioned above. Spend some time fine-tuning your profiles, branding yourself, and being a forward-thinking job seeker. Branding yourself comes with its own set of challenges, so if you want a professional to help you develop your brand, LinkedIn profile, social networking sites, and more, call 800.991.5187 or visit Great Resumes Fast today. We guarantee interviews and your job search success. If a new LinkedIn profile today means interviews tomorrow, it’s worth the investment!

Article courtesy of the Recruiting Blogswap, a content exchange service sponsored by CollegeRecruiter.com, a leading site for college students looking for internships and recent graduates searching for entry level jobs and other career opportunities.


Stop Being Lost in the Crowd

November 15, 2010

By: Jessica Hernandez is the President/CEO of Great Resumes
Author Website: http://www.greatresumesfast.com

Is your LinkedIn profile a verbatim recreation of your resume? Or is it a unique and complementary representation of you and your job search? I know a plethora of job seekers who simply cut and paste their resumes right into their LinkedIn profiles. Let me tell you why this is NOT the best job search strategy. I’ll also tell you how to capture the hiring manager’s attention and—potentially—the interview.

1. If you’re putting your LinkedIn profile address on your resume, then you can expect employers to go there (You are putting this on your resume, right? Please tell me you’re including this on your resume!). So instead of just repeating what they’ve already just read, give them something new, inspiring, and something that makes them want to connect. Hiring managers don’t just hire skills—they hire personalities. Let them see part of yours—and make it shine.

2. 90% or better of employers are now going online to research their potential candidates. I don’t know about you, but I would much rather they find my LinkedIn profile and the information I’ve put together in it at the top of their search results rather than some college kid’s rants on his personal blog or FB page about a drunken party (who just happens to share your name). They will search for you; give them great information to confirm that you are the best candidate for the job.

3. People want a personal connection and to know you’re a great match on paper and in person. You can be slightly more laid back on LinkedIn and discuss interests and expand on your background and expertise in ways you can’t on your resume. Reading lists, blog articles, groups, connections, etc. These are all ways to show the employer who you are and—again—what you have to offer. Position yourself as a subject matter expert—and when the hiring manager needs someone in your industry, they’ll know just who to come to.

I could go on and on about why branding your LinkedIn profile is so important, but the bottom line is: If you want to be found by recruiters and hiring managers, if you want to cement your reputation and brand in their mind and secure the interview, start branding your profile today. Otherwise, you’re just the same as every other joe jobseeker among the millions of people on LinkedIn. Stop being like everyone else and blending in and be discovered today. Learn more about professional LinkedIn profile development here.

Expert resume writer Jessica Hernandez is the President/CEO of Great Resumes Fast a top-tier job search and resume writing firm. Jessica and her team’s work has secured top careers for forward-focused executives and professionals. Named to numerous career expert blogs, Web sites and Twitter lists, she is a credentialed writer, former fortune 500 hiring manager and frequent media source, author, columnist, and published contributor to multiple career, job search and resume advice books. Jessica is also the Resume Makeover coach for the JobTalkAmerica radio program and offers her expert advice and tips weekly on the show.

Article courtesy of the Recruiting Blogswap, a content exchange service sponsored by CollegeRecruiter.com, a leading site for college students looking for internships and recent graduates searching for entry level jobs and other career opportunities.