The “NEW” Normal…

October 26, 2011

Are you trying to deal with the “New Normal” in your life?  If you are like millions of American’s who are dealing with unemployment or under-employment, your “New Normal” might seem pretty frustrating compared the life you had prior to job-loss…

Well, even though this”New Normal” might not be what you want, it is what it is.  Now you have two choices.  Sit there and lament on how “great your life was” or start moving in a new direction.  Here is a video from my good friend, John Spence.  Just a few weeks ago he presented a program at the Apple Specialist Marketing Conference. His talk was  entitled “The New Normal” and focused on how these folks, who sold such incredible Apple products, could continue to be successful as the realities of business and economics remained in constant fluctuation. The talk was even more poignant given the fact that Steve Jobs had passed away just a week earlier.

Here is a very brief excerpt of some of the ideas he shared.  Even though his comments are focused on how he feels companies can survive and thrive in “The New Normal”, the points he makes are just as relevant to you as a job seeker who may be struggling with your “”New Normal”.

I look forward to your comments…


Talking Salary in an Interview…

July 7, 2011

Interviews are never easy. No matter how many you’ve been through there is always that uncomfortable feeling, the nerves & feeling like it’s all about “not” selecting you for the position.  The interview process is leaving a trail of very disgruntled job seekers in its wake.  It is so difficult not to take job rejection personally.

This makes it even more uncomfortable for someone when they’re interested in talking about compensation in the interview.  I am not trying to put the cart before the horse, but it is important (in the immortal words of Steven Covey) to begin with the end in mind.  The end of the interview process is obviously the discussion surrounding compensation – both salary & benefits.  You have to know what it is that you are seeking in compensation.  We have some responses from people who want what they want and refuse to take less…

…Also as far as the compensation question goes I usually try to say that I am quite flexible and that I’m sure if the fit is right between my skills and the needs of the employer then we should be able to agree on a suitable number.

I mention that the whole package, health care benefits, 401K, etc is a part of the discussion, not just a single salary number. If none of that works, then I push back and give a wide range (the lowest I would consider) to a fairly high number and say that their location may also affect the range (if you’re willing to move to a higher cost of living area, etc). Hope that helps! – Marcia J.

This is an example of a job applicant taking the power into their own hands and refusing to be pushed around by a company that believes they can get cheap workers because of the recession. Another strategy is to back load your contract…Read to learn how to bring it up….

A group that I attend had this discussion the other day and someone came up with one suggestion that was pretty good. “Over the last “X” years my salary has consisted of a base and incentive that allowed me to make “$XK”. I want to find a position that will enable me to make that same amount in some sort of mix of those components.

In that way you allow them to back load with a bonus that is set up to let you earn more money. You do have to make sure that you have the bonus clearly spelled out and that it is not capped etc. Just one suggestion. – Pam N.

These are both good options for talking salary.   You need to have a clear-cut and definitive strategy for talking salary in the interview… if not, you might get the short end of the stick!

Land the Interview Coaching


Do What You Love, Love What You Do

April 19, 2011

By: Phil Rosenberg, President http://reCareered.blogspot.com

People in career transition often pause to take stock. One of the really valuable parts of job changing is taking the time to decide “What do I want to do?”

Too many of us stay locked into jobs or careers that we hate because we’re afraid of change, afraid of risk, or simply don’t believe we can get paid for doing what we love.

Today’s internet provides amazing opportunities to those considering alternate careers. Many Web 2.0 tools give an amazing ability to create subject matter expertise and monetize what we love to do. For instance, a friend was a journalism graduate who didn’t end up working in a traditional corporate journalism job, but wanted to write and run her own show.

So whether your passion is running, stamp collecting, baseball, travel, scrapbooking, cooking, or Chicago’s nightlife, consider that you might make your passion your job.

Learn more about making your passion into your job …

( Continued … )

Article: http://recareered.blogspot.com/2010/06/do-what-you-love-love-what-you-do.html

Article courtesy of the Recruiting Blogswap, a content exchange service sponsored by CollegeRecruiter.com, a leading site for college students looking for internships and recent graduates searching for entry level jobs and other career opportunities.


The Impression Equation

April 12, 2011

By: Trevor Wilson, Founder of Gradversity.com

It’s been said that in an interview, the employer will make up his mind within the first five minutes as to whether to hire you. If you have ever read Blink (which is a great book by Malcolm Gladwell, author of The Tipping Point), you probably even have less time to make a great first impression.

This is where the Impression Equation comes in.

What is the Impression Equation? It is the formula that you need to follow for making a good first impression. It goes as follows:

Impression = Appearance + Attitude

In other words, the impression that you make on the employer will be your general appearance plus your attitude in the first five minutes. To break it down even further:

* Appearance: This doesn’t mean that you have to be naturally beautiful or handsome. It only means that you have to make an effort to look your best. Things such as professional attire, trimmed nails, and maintained hair are what count. You have to let your appearance show how much you want to the job, without trying to “give the wrong impression”, so to speak.

* Attitude: This is not what you say, this is how you act. Do you portray confidence? Do you smile? Do you make eye contact? Do you speak clearly? Do you gesture appropriately? All of these things make up how your attitude will be perceived by the employer.

Without either of these elements, you cannot make a good impression. So beyond just preparing for what you will say in the interview, make sure you address how you look and how you act. It will make an enormous difference in whether you land the job.

Trevor Wilson is an author and consultant who works with new graduates preparing to enter the work force. His site, Gradversity.com, provides daily advice on job hunting, networking, and resume writing tailored to the Entry Level Job seeker. His first book, Overcoming Gradversity: How to Break Into the Entry Level Job Market, was published in 2008.

Article courtesy of the Recruiting Blogswap, a content exchange service sponsored by CollegeRecruiter.com, a leading site for college students looking for internships and recent graduates searching for entry level jobs and other career opportunities.


Applied Online? Now Get Your Resume to Rise to the Top of Their Pile!

February 1, 2011

By Kathy Bernard, Get a Job Blogs & Workshops

Ever feel like you are sending your resume into a pit of no return when you apply for a job on an online site? I’ve found a good way to get your resume noticed by the hiring manager or recruiter after you apply online. It involves using www.LinkedIn.com, so if you aren’t registered on this important free business networking site yet, establish a profile there as soon as you can. Then invite all of your friends and colleague to connect with you there. The more LinkedIn connections you have, the greater access you will have to an extended network of your first degree connections and all of your connections’ first and second degree connections.

Once you are on www.LinkedIn.com and have established connections, use the search box to try to learn the hiring manager and/or recruiter’s name. Do so by using the drop down menu to “Search People” and then type in the company’s name. Search through the results to find the people with the leadership or recruiting titles you seek.

Contact these people through one of these means:

  • If they are a second degree connection (if one the people is a friend of one of your first degree LinkedIn connections), click the button “Get introduced through a connection” and follow the prompts. This will allow a friend of yours to send your message to the person. Alternatively, you can send a regular email with your resume to your friend and ask him/her to forward your resume to his/her connection and put in a good word for you.
  • Send the hiring manager or recruiter a LinkedIn “Inmessage” (this requires a monthly LinkedIn upgrade cost)
  • Try to find the person’s email address on Google by putting the person’s name and company name in the search box and seeing if his/her contact information comes up in the search findings. (Their contact information might be in a directory, for example).
  • If you can’t find the person’s email address online, but the job requires you to apply by emailing (for example) Bob Brown at bbrown@blank.com, you now know the construction of email addresses at that company. So if you learn the hiring manager is Becky Thatcher at the same company, you know that her email address is probably bthatcher@blank.com. Use that knowledge to send her a personal email and attach your resume.

Of course another option is to try calling the company’s main switchboard and asking for the name and email address of the recruiter or director of the such and such department.

Taking these approaches has worked well for me because they show potential employers that I am proactive and resourceful. Personal approaches also appeal to recipients’ egos because they know I sought them out specifically. So start emailing key people after you apply online … after all, it could help you Get a Job!


Going Outside the Traditional Resume to Capture the Interview

November 23, 2010

Going Outside the Traditional Resume to Capture the Interview
By: Jessica has a true passion for the job seeker, evidenced by her desire to share everything she can with everyone she can about resume writing and interviewing.
Author Website: http://www.greatresumesfast.com

This past week I was on JobTalkAmerica, a radio show designed around the needs of job seekers in today’s tough economic climate. On the show I discussed two critical points your resume must have in order to succeed and also how to go outside of your resume to get the interview. I want to elaborate further on what you can do outside of your resume that can help you get the interview.

A PROFESSIONALLY WRITTEN LINKEDIN PROFILE

This past week we had a client upload the professional LinkedIn profile that we developed for him and the first day it was online he got an interview with one of his target companies. I think this alone speaks volumes about what a LinkedIn profile can do. You need a keyword-optimized profile, and now LinkedIn has added even more features that will make it easier for employers to find you! Utilize the new features like adding skills, certifications, or publications to your profile; this increases the chances that employers will find you when they’re searching for someone with your background and experience.

A GOOGLE PROFILE

I keep hearing these insane statistics about how many employers are googling potential candidates to research them; this is where a Google profile comes in. Creating a branded and engaging profile gives the hiring manager more information about you and it’s in a place they’re going to look anyway!

A WEB RESUME

A Web resume is another great way to get your experience and expertise out there and make it all searchable. With modern technology these days you really have to up your job search game and find new and creative ways to get in front of the hiring manager. If you know where the hiring manager is (searching on the Net) then that’s where you need to be. It’s another compelling way to brand yourself, direct the information hiring managers find about you, and secure your place in a competitive market.

SOCIAL NETWORKING

Every element of your social networking and online job search should be connected to one another. I have my twitter account linked to my LinkedIn account and my Facebook page; then I have my blog attached to each one of those. I’m hoping I won’t lose you here while I go a bit deeper, but anytime I post to my blog it automatically posts a link to my twitter account, a note to my Facebook page, and an updated blog post to my LinkedIn profile. So everything is interconnected. It saves me time but also refreshes every social network I’m on at the same time; so my fans, followers, and connections can always see what’s new. Tweet, write, and comment on your career, field of interest, and related information, and it won’t go unnoticed!

A VISUAL CV & VIDEO RESUME

A visual CV and video resume are two additional ways to increase your presence on the Internet. I equate a visual CV to a Web resume, although it is a bit more interactive. However, a video resume to me is more cutting edge and attention getting, and while you may not e-mail your video resume to the employer directly when applying or upload it in the application, you can post a link to the video resume in your e-mail signature and on your resume! This leads the hiring manager to more convincing and engaging information about you!

If I were in a job search this is exactly what I’d do:

I would create a video resume and post it to my visual CV as well as my Web resume, LinkedIn profile, Facebook page, and link to my twitter account. But most of all, I would create a blog or personal Web site and upload it there. I would include a link to my LinkedIn profile and video resume on my resume and cover letter whenever I submit it—and also include a link to both in my e-mail signature. Get your information out there—because hiring managers want to see it!

Capture the interview by going where the hiring managers are—online (and they’re not necessarily on the pricey job boards). So get off the job boards and visit the sites I’ve mentioned above. Spend some time fine-tuning your profiles, branding yourself, and being a forward-thinking job seeker. Branding yourself comes with its own set of challenges, so if you want a professional to help you develop your brand, LinkedIn profile, social networking sites, and more, call 800.991.5187 or visit Great Resumes Fast today. We guarantee interviews and your job search success. If a new LinkedIn profile today means interviews tomorrow, it’s worth the investment!

Article courtesy of the Recruiting Blogswap, a content exchange service sponsored by CollegeRecruiter.com, a leading site for college students looking for internships and recent graduates searching for entry level jobs and other career opportunities.


Post Mid-Term Elections…

November 11, 2010

These past elections have put many new faces into our government offices. We’d like to thank everyone who also voted in our “I Lost My Job, Not My Vote” polls.

LINK: The polls are still open, in case you want to check them out

ILostMyJob.com/vote

NOW, the *real work* begins for our elected officials. It is easier to make promises than to keep them.

As a reminder to all our elected and government officials, here are the results of our polls, as of today. The struggles for people in job transition are FAR from over, but as long as progress is being made and people are listening to each other, there is hope. And hope is inspirational!

POLL 1

LINK: Unemployment & Financial / Legal Matters

POLL 2

LINK: What Should a Person Do About Job Loss?

POLL 3

LINK: Speak Your Mind – How Would You Create Jobs?

POLL 4

LINK: Thought About Volunteering?

POLL 5

LINK: Do You Have a Checklist?