Post Mid-Term Elections…

November 11, 2010

These past elections have put many new faces into our government offices. We’d like to thank everyone who also voted in our “I Lost My Job, Not My Vote” polls.

LINK: The polls are still open, in case you want to check them out

ILostMyJob.com/vote

NOW, the *real work* begins for our elected officials. It is easier to make promises than to keep them.

As a reminder to all our elected and government officials, here are the results of our polls, as of today. The struggles for people in job transition are FAR from over, but as long as progress is being made and people are listening to each other, there is hope. And hope is inspirational!

POLL 1

LINK: Unemployment & Financial / Legal Matters

POLL 2

LINK: What Should a Person Do About Job Loss?

POLL 3

LINK: Speak Your Mind – How Would You Create Jobs?

POLL 4

LINK: Thought About Volunteering?

POLL 5

LINK: Do You Have a Checklist?

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Falling behind on your bills?

July 23, 2010

By Chris Isidore, senior writer CNNMoney

NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) — Falling behind on your bills? It could cost you a job.

An increasing number of employers are using credit checks to screen potential job applicants. So missed payments on your mortgage, car or credit card could keep you from getting hired.

According to a survey by the Society for Human Resource Management, 60% of employers are using credit checks when filling at least some of their openings. Only 35% reported checking credit in a 2003 survey, and only about 13% did so 1996.

The timing could not be worse.

“At exactly the time everyone’s credit seems to be going down the toilet, more and more employers are using this,” said Nat Lippert, research analyst for the union Unite Here. “You get in a Catch-22: You can’t pay your bills because you don’t have a job, and now you can’t get a job because you can’t pay your bills.”

Unite Here has been active in a recent push for laws to greatly limit employer’s use of the credit reports in hiring decisions.

So far three states have passed such laws — Hawaii, Oregon and Washington, and legislation has already passed in Illinois and is headed to the governor. The laws would make it illegal for employers to access credit history unless they can show that it’s relevant to a job’s duties, such as handling money or having access to customers’ financial information.

Bills have been introduced in 16 other states and the District of Columbia, and Federal legislation is currently pending in Congress.

Businesses have pushed back hard against such laws.

“Is it helpful to the employment process? Employers seem to think yes. They don’t spend money on products they don’t think bring value” said Stuart Pratt, CEO of Consumer Data Industry Association, the trade association for the credit rating agencies.

Pratt says that a credit check gives employers details about accounts in collection, debt levels, bankruptcies and other problems that would cast doubt on someone’s ability to handle responsibility. It does not report credit scores or account numbers.

Pratt also argues that the credit histories are only one factor considered by employers, and that prospective employees are supposed to be given the chance to respond to what their credit check turns up.

But consumer advocates and some job seekers say that candidates are being unfairly judged by the circumstances of their private lives.

“Employers have adopted this method as a proxy for character reference, believing it reflects on people’s ability to handle responsibility,” said Ben Woolsey, director of marketing and consumer research for CreditCards.com. “That’s a bit of a reach.”

If you’re looking for advice how to deal with credit in your job search, check out iLostMyJob.com’s Articles:

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10 Things You MUST Know About Budgeting

July 6, 2010

THE SKINNY: Ducks love Budgets – Humans hate them.  What gives anyway?

DOCTORS ORDERS:  Budgets can make you or break you.  Here’s the scoop.  Budgets:

  1. Take COMPOSURE and SELF-DISCIPLINE to prepare
  2. Are PIVOTAL to your financial health (regardless of your income)
  3. Are as much SCIENCE as ART
  4. Can make the difference between WEALTH & POVERTY
  5. Must be FLUID
  6. Are meant to STRENGTHEN you
  7. Require PLANNING and FORESIGHT
  8. Keep you on PACE
  9. Are Tegdubs spelled backwards

10.  Are not real exciting, but they do WORK.

FOR THE ULTIMATE CHEAPSKATE:  Do your budget faithfully just like brushing your teeth.

GO FOR THIS TIP IF:  You really want to get ahead.

FORGET IT IF:  You like the paycheck to paycheck gig.

For more budget tips check out iLostMyJob.com’s Article: Getting your Finances in Order

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