Are you a job-seeker looking for something different?

October 6, 2011

If you are like many job-seekers that I work with on a daily basis, you are frustrated with the job market.  Who isn’t?  The economy certainly is not rebounding as quickly as any of us would like and many are finding the number of opportunities for gainful employment are becoming fewer and fewer…

So, what’s your option?

Well, for many becoming more entrepreneurial has been the answer.  Now, this option is not for everyone, but it could be.  Have you checked out my interview with a serial entrepreneur?   CLICK HERE to read… or you can WATCH a really cool video  about one guys journey in starting a business.

You may also want to work through these 5 concepts that my good friend John Spence brought forth in his recent blog, you can read the entire article here, but in the meantime, here are the highlights:

1. If you really want to be a serial entrepreneur, you have to create a mindset of looking at everything through the lens of: “What is the business idea here? Where is the pain in the marketplace, the frustration, the opportunity? What can I do to build a product or service that will take away the pain or take advantage of the opportunity?”

2. Once you start creating dozens and dozens of business ideas, the next step is to be brutally honest in assessing which ones are truly viable. In other words, what will people actually pay for?

3. Now that you have filtered all of your ideas down to a handful that truly represent a great business opportunity, the next step is to build the best possible team you can put together to take your ideas and turn them into products and services.

4. You’ve got a handful of super cool ideas, you’ve built an amazing team of highly talented people… now it all comes down to the last piece of the equation which nearly every entrepreneur struggles mightily with… Disciplined Execution.

5. Last but not least – if humanly possible never give away ownership.

So many of these concepts can also be put into place if you are going through the job search process.  So, do any of you have additional suggestions?

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2 Entrepreneur Lessons from “Mr. Ketchup” – H.J. Heinz

September 15, 2010

2 Lessons for Starting a Company from Henry John Heinz

Starting a company from nearly nothing seems to be the the American way.  Discovering a great idea, cultivating it and making a success seems to be the way many of our countries fondest figures rose to prominence.  Not through some great investment from a family member but through humble beginnings and heroic decisions.

H.J. Heinz is no different.  The man whose name has graced nearly every american table in the past 100 years in 57 different varieties or more has a very similar story.

Henry John Heinz - H.J. Heinz

#1 Heinz Lesson: Do Something You Love & Money Will Come

H.J. Heinz or “Harry” as his family called him was a young boy when his family settled on the south side of what is now Pittsburg, Pennsylvania.  Born to a brick layer and a religiously devote mother, H.J. quickly learned his passion.

At age 6, H.J. started helping his mother in the garden.  Spending hours often past dark in the garden, H.J. gained an appreciation for the purity of fresh vegetables.

At age 9, H.J. started selling his vegetables to the neighbors carrying a basket over his arm. Door-to-door H.J. learned selling, marketing and accounting to keep his business successful and his customers wanting more.

At age 10, his mother gave him 3 acres of land to garden himself. After a little time to learn the ropes of gardening on a bigger scale, H.J. graduated to a wheelbarrow to deliver his goods to the customers in town.

At age 12, H.J. worked 3 & 1/2 acres of land using a horse and cart for his 3 deliveries a week to grocery stories in the local towns.

At age 17 in 1861, H.J. was grossing $2,400 a year.  In 2009, that’s $56626.18 a year.  Pretty good living for a farmer with no formal education.

#2 Heinz Lesson: Quality is Your Reputation

In 1905 journalist Upton Sinclair published, “The Jungle“.  The Jungle highlighted the plight of working class Americans in the meat packing industry in lower Chicago during the turn of the century.

Upton Sinclair’s book was a commercial success and instantly created a public outcry for better government regulation on the food administration.  This book is the touchstone which started the argument for the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906, which launched the Bureau of Chemistry which later became the FDA.

But before the Pure Food & Drug Act of 1906 could be passed it had it’s day in public opinion just like our issues of today.  On one side you had the workers & customers on the other side you had a business owners & managers.

H.J. Heinz as a very influential man in the food industry during this time, took a very controversial approach.  He lobbyied on behalf of the Pure Food and Drug Act of 1906.  H.J. sided with the workers & customers against his other business owners.

Similar to arguments of today, business owners didn’t want government regulation over them while they operated their business.

None of the gossip about the decision bothered H.J. Heinz because he knew what type of quality he expected from his own products.  H.J. was known for his over the top quality for the time.  He is quoted as saying, “We will never save pennies at the expense of our reputation.”

H.J. Heinz always knew that quality controls would make for a better product, happier customers and a more competitive market. It wasn’t simply about a low bottom line to H.J. Heinz, it was about making a quality product no matter the cost.

Thinking about Starting a Company?

If you consider starting a company like H.J. Heinz did, you should Read our interview with Bill PeltonMr. Pelton is a modern entrepreuner with a similar yet updated story.

He answers questions ranging from:

Bill Pelton explains his story about meeting the man who changed his life, why who you marry is the most important business decision you’ll ever make & how even being the #2 salesman in the nation doesn’t create job security.

If you’re thinking about starting a business & have read the interview with Bill Peton, ask yourself the 20 Questions before Starting a Business

For entrenpuer tools & information on starting a business check out http://www.ilostmyjob.com/Entrepreneur


Q&A with Seasoned Entrepreneur Bill Pelton

September 13, 2010

Q&A with a “Seasoned Entrepreneur”

Bill Pelton

Bill Pelton

Background on Mr. Pelton

Mr. Pelton is a leading authority on video streaming over the internet. Mr. Pelton was the initial founder of DayPort, Inc in 1996. DayPort is now the market leader in video streaming & video management for the internet & recently was acquired by Entriq, now Irdeto.  Mr. Pelton led sales efforts for DayPort taking them from a startup to an impressive client list of companies including CBS/Viacom, Clear Channel Television, Scripts Howard, Oprah Winfrey and others.

“Obstacles are those frightful things you see when you take your eyes off your goal.” –Henry Ford

Thinking about Starting a Company?

Learn from a seasoned Entrepreneur…Read our interview with Bill Pelton.

He answers questions ranging from:

Bill Pelton explains his story about meeting the man who changed his life, why who you marry is the most important business decision you’ll ever make & how even being the #2 salesman in the nation doesn’t create job security.

If you’re thinking about starting a business & have read the interview with Bill Peton, ask yourself the 20 Questions before Starting a Business

For entrenpuer tools & information on starting a business check out http://www.ilostmyjob.com/Entrepreneur

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