Your secret weapon as a job seeker!

July 19, 2011

One of the greatest (and most under-utilized) weapons in the job-seeker’s arsenal is the ability to effectively listen.  Unfortunately, when you are in front of a potential employer as a job seeker, you may be so intent on telling the employer all about you, your work history, your accomplishments and all of the other great things about yourself, that you are not LISTENING to the needs that the employer has.

Here is a video I would like for you to watch on effective listening skills.  I want you to watch it from the perspective of being in a job interview.

OK… so know that you have learned a little bit more about effective listening skills, how can you implement some of these ideas into your interview preparation?

Please share your ideas with others…

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Talking Salary in an Interview…

July 7, 2011

Interviews are never easy. No matter how many you’ve been through there is always that uncomfortable feeling, the nerves & feeling like it’s all about “not” selecting you for the position.  The interview process is leaving a trail of very disgruntled job seekers in its wake.  It is so difficult not to take job rejection personally.

This makes it even more uncomfortable for someone when they’re interested in talking about compensation in the interview.  I am not trying to put the cart before the horse, but it is important (in the immortal words of Steven Covey) to begin with the end in mind.  The end of the interview process is obviously the discussion surrounding compensation – both salary & benefits.  You have to know what it is that you are seeking in compensation.  We have some responses from people who want what they want and refuse to take less…

…Also as far as the compensation question goes I usually try to say that I am quite flexible and that I’m sure if the fit is right between my skills and the needs of the employer then we should be able to agree on a suitable number.

I mention that the whole package, health care benefits, 401K, etc is a part of the discussion, not just a single salary number. If none of that works, then I push back and give a wide range (the lowest I would consider) to a fairly high number and say that their location may also affect the range (if you’re willing to move to a higher cost of living area, etc). Hope that helps! – Marcia J.

This is an example of a job applicant taking the power into their own hands and refusing to be pushed around by a company that believes they can get cheap workers because of the recession. Another strategy is to back load your contract…Read to learn how to bring it up….

A group that I attend had this discussion the other day and someone came up with one suggestion that was pretty good. “Over the last “X” years my salary has consisted of a base and incentive that allowed me to make “$XK”. I want to find a position that will enable me to make that same amount in some sort of mix of those components.

In that way you allow them to back load with a bonus that is set up to let you earn more money. You do have to make sure that you have the bonus clearly spelled out and that it is not capped etc. Just one suggestion. – Pam N.

These are both good options for talking salary.   You need to have a clear-cut and definitive strategy for talking salary in the interview… if not, you might get the short end of the stick!

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